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Drug addiction continues to be a major problem in the United States. In fact the variety of drugs to which an individual can become addicted continues to increase regularly. There is a growing shift from addiction to illegal street drugs to addictions to prescribed medicinal and psychotropic drugs. However it happens, acquiring the problem is the easy part, dealing with it is much more difficult. Determining the causes and the biological consequences and effects of addiction is a science. It is studied by mental health professionals as well as neurology specialists who seek to understand the effects of substances and chronic use on the brain.

One of the accepted mental health perspectives on the mind and addiction is the theory that a drug addict’s mind is no longer their own but is under the unfortunate control of the addictive substance. The addict surrenders their free will and ever thought and behavioral motive is based on how to get the next high or to sustain the current one. It is common for the addict to completely ignore personal and professional obligations, to ruin relationships and sabotage careers. They lose the capacity to care for themselves and others and become willing to do anything to obtain their drug. This frequently leads to stilling from loved ones and even selling one’s body either for cash or trade in drug.

The exact effects on the brain caused by substance abuse and drug addiction depend on the type of drug being used and also the length of time in which the abuse has occurred. There can be other factors that weigh in as well. Heroin is one of the drugs that is well known for destroying the lives and the health of those that abuse it. It is impossible to use regularly and not become addicted, which is a rude awakening for many people. Unfortunately, by that point it is too late to care. Heroin addiction causes the brain to become dependent on the drug to function properly. There is an early rush of euphoric pleasure that accompanies heroin though it quickly fades into fog and the user immediately attempts to regain the high.

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