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Diablo Valley Ranch is located in Clayton, California, it provides long term drug rehab and substance abuse care with a primary focus on dual diagnosis Services provided include buprenorphine used in treatment, and substance abuse treatment. Special programs available include programs for clients with hiv or aids, programs for gays and lesbians (lgbt), programs for seniors and older adults, programs for men, programs for addicted criminal justice clients, and programs for people with a dual diagnosis (co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders).
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11540 Marsh Creek Road,
Clayton CA 94517
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Primary Focus
  • Dual Diagnosis
Services Provided
  • Substance abuse treatment
  • Buprenorphine used in treatment
Type of Care
  • Residential long-term treatment (more than 30 days)
Special Programs
  • Dual Diagnosis - persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders
  • Persons with HIV/AIDS
  • Gays and Lesbians
  • Seniors/older adults
  • Men
  • Criminal justice clients
Payments Accepted
  • Medicaid
  • Medicare
  • Private health insurance
  • Military Insurance (e.g.VA, TRICARE)
  • Self payment
Payments Assistance
  • Sliding fee scale (Fee is based on income and other factors)

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7 Comments

JaniceDecember 22, 2011 at 3:38 pm

son has GHB adiction he needs help he is not employed he has contra costa county health adult care program

 

JaniceDecember 22, 2011 at 3:38 pm

Please call the 1800 number on the site they will be able to point you in the right direction. Good luck with your journey.

 

JaniceDecember 22, 2011 at 3:38 pm

I honestly think its ridiculous and careless that you people house male and females together! My son had attended this program and he said he was often to shy or embarrassed to open up. He’s a very private person as it is. And when you add the female gender in the picture it really makes things more difficult! And I’m sure its vise-a-versa. Please let the facility be strictly for one gender. I just think that’s awful!

 

JaniceDecember 22, 2011 at 3:38 pm

Hi I,m Brett Turner a EX member of the SUNRISE REHAB HOUSE in Pacheco , Ca MY COUNSELOR was Denise and teacher . Denise now works with DVR I,m hoping to GEt her email . I need her HELP # ADVICE on a Rehabilitation aspects etc stuff why I,m in Outpatient program Chance for freedom now I gotta Show Mr lendsey the Right Material from a POINT of View on the 12 Steps dealing from my recovery . Denise was a Good teacher # Counselor I know her Brother Marshall etc grew up with him ? Can you please give to Denise have her reply by today so I can ask a Few Questions for help and her referalls or Contacts Please , Thankyou Brett Turner …

 

JaniceDecember 22, 2011 at 3:38 pm

My son in law has been very successful with your program and I would like my Son to have a chance his addiction is meth he had no health coverage I would be paying for him what’s the average cost?

 

JaniceDecember 22, 2011 at 3:38 pm

One of the panelists told us that she reeejtcd her first offer because she would be the first woman in that department, and she had suspected that they were interested not in her personally but jut in hiring a woman to improve their statistics.I can’t quite tell agreeing with me or disagreeing with me with this example, but I agree with you that this can be a disturbing trend, too, and can make it that much harder for math departments to hire women. I admit that I was thinking more in terms of female graduate students who might decide to leave mathematics to pursue other things because they were unhappy with not having a lot of other women in the department, though. I’ve heard several stories like this, and it’s easy to dismiss graduate students leaving as them just not being able to make it in the department, but if women *are* being scared off by things that have nothing to do with their ability level, and if a meeting like this can keep them from leaving, then I don’t see why it’s such a terrible thing to have such meetings.why should it be a mathematical meeting arranged in such a way that all speakers must be women? You could easily have a women’s issues panel at a “normal” meeting.Well, again, from other comments here, it sounds like there are plenty of fields of mathematics where a “normal” meeting would not have enough women for such a panel. You mentioned that this event has become traditional, at the beginning of each semester-long program. Maybe at some point, they tried to organize such a panel at a “normal” meeting, and realized that they couldn’t do it.Besides, now that I am thinking more about this, I don’t see why you think it’s such a horrible idea to have a meeting specifically highlighting women’s accomplishments in a field of mathematics, so that younger women who might otherwise have been scared off from a traditionally male-dominated field can see what women specifically have already accomplished. That sounds like it might be a useful thing – more useful in many ways than a “women’s issues” panel hidden within a meeting focused on something else.You seem to be thinking about this meeting in terms of affirmative action – like men are being discriminated against by not being allowed to be speakers at this meeting. (And women are being insulted by the implication that they are only being considered as speakers because they are women.) But if the *theme* of the meeting is women’s accomplishments in the field, why *shouldn’t* all the speakers be women? Do you want them to invite some men to speak about the accomplishments of women they know, when they could be inviting those women themselves?

 

JaniceDecember 22, 2011 at 3:38 pm

diablo valley ranch gave me a life.
I went there when I was age 20 and again at age thirty I was lucky , and lived there for 6 months.
I learned basic life skills and developed a sense that people and god care for me.
and those feelings have helped me ever since then, for many years now—I was a real alcoholic and meth addict

 

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